Policy

For Justice, Forensic Science Must Be Scientific: The Case Of Kevin Keith

I was recently interview on Kim Kardashian’s podcast The System to discuss the case of Kevin Keith who was sentenced to death in 1994 based on what appears to be heavily flawed forensic evidence. The case highlights many of the flaws inherent in the current practice of Forensic Sciences. In this Forbes article, I argue that …

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Mental health: pressure to return to the office could be making employees more anxious

Many employers are eager for staff to return to the office after a year of social distancing, mask wearing, and working from home. However, a recent survey of 4,553 office workers in five different countries, found that every single person reported feeling anxious about resuming in-person work. The top causes of return-to-work stress included being …

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The Biden Administration Must Put The Science Back Into Forensic Science

Movies and TV shows depict dazzling uses of forensic sciences in the courts, but reality itself falls far behind and countless miscarriages of justice are the result of bad science. I make the case in this Forbes article for the new administration to re-establish the National Commission of Forensic Science, or another independent entity committed to …

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Conflicts of interest and disclosure

The Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry was established on 14 December 2017 by the former Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia, His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd) to enquire into misconduct in the banking, superannuation and financial services industry. I was asked by the Royal Commission to respond to the following questions: How …

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Effect of reminders of personal sacrifice and suggested rationalizations on residents’ self-reported willingness to accept gifts.

Authored Chapter 7 for Thinking about Bribery (Neuroscience, Moral Cognition and the Psychology of Bribery) with Loewenstein, G. Bribery is perhaps the most visible and most frequently studied form of corruption. Very little research, however, examines the individual decision to offer or accept a bribe, or how understanding that decision can help to effectively control …

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Confessing One’s Sins but Still Committing Them: Transparency and the Failure of Disclosure.

Authored Chapter 6 for Behavioural Public Policy with Cain, D., & Loewenstein, G. How can individuals best be encouraged to take more responsibility for their well-being and their environment or to behave more ethically in their business transactions? Across the world, governments are showing a growing interest in using behavioural economic research to inform the …

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